REVIEW: “Before Watchmen: Minutemen #2”

REVIEW: “Before Watchmen: Minutemen #2”

Perhaps by luck, kismet, or design, the release of Before Watchmen: Minutemen #2 falls during comic-con week. As I mentioned in my previous Before Watchmen review, Minutemen is being set up to be the most important arc in the event. The other titles each cover individual characters in the second generation ofWatchmen that, while mostly very solid books, are covering characters that have already been given a great amount of detail and history in Allan Moore’s original. Minutemen continues to be revealing, cinematic, pulpy,…

Read More

REVIEW: “Action Comics #11”

REVIEW: “Action Comics #11”

I wish I could say that this was another perfect issue of Action Comics, but that would be a stretch. Grant Morrison rarely achieves perfection, largely because he is so interested in experimentation. In this issue, we get to see his experiment in telling a Superman story without Clark Kent. SPOILER WARNING: If you haven’t read last month’s issue of Action Comics, go out and pick it up before you read any further. This issue…

Read More

Ms. Marvel No More

Ms. Marvel No More

Earlier this month, I had an opportunity to steal a few minutes from writer Kelly Sue DeConnick when she was in town to speak at WisCon, the feminist science fiction conference held yearly in Madison, Wisconsin. In addition to her rather epic run on Osborn for Marvel, she has penned a terrific adaptation of ABC’s Castle meta-fiction, Deadly Storm. Her major upcoming project, and the subject of today’s piece, is Captain Marvel, which hits shelves…

Read More

REVIEW: “America’s Got Powers #2”

REVIEW: “America’s Got Powers #2”

How would our society treat the truly “different?”  If young men and women suddenly displayed abilities and changes unlike anything in recorded history, what would happen to concepts like all men are created equal? Writer Jonathan Ross has spent his career as a newsman, asking hard questions of the powers around the world. In America’s Got Powers, he uses the fantastical device of a sudden appearance of super-humans to call into question some of the…

Read More

EDITORIAL: “Worst Comic Ever”… I Think Not

EDITORIAL: “Worst Comic Ever”… I Think Not

Friday, in a piece for the Wall Street Journal, Tim Marchman wrote an article examining the recent release of Leaping Tall Buildings: The Origin of American Comics. From this he extracts a scathing critique of the comic book industry, claiming that the market doesn’t show nearly the strength in sales that it should, especially in the wake of the recent success of “The Avengers” film. While he rightly contends that super-hero comics are not reaching the same type of…

Read More

REVIEW: Blood of Palomar

REVIEW: Blood of Palomar

Set in the 1980s, Blood of Palomar is a thrilling book about Palomar, a fictional, chaotic Latin American town. The main thread is the murder mystery. The bodies pile up quickly, and clues are given along the way, sometimes subtly tucked into the artwork. An uneducated teen artist, Humberto, is the only one who knows the killer’s     identity. His promising art starts as abstract drawings of all the people of Palomar; he loses his mind…

Read More

REVIEW: “Secret Avengers #27”

REVIEW: “Secret Avengers #27”

Another week, another new AVX tie-in, as “Secret Avengers #27” proves to be an enjoyable installment! This issue reads a little differently than previous arcs of Secret Avengers due to only half the core cast members appearing. Thor, Ms. Marvel, Vision and Protector guest star, which may leave some feeling like this story could have taken place in a different Avengers book. Although the crossover halts the momentum set in place by previous plot threads,…

Read More

REVIEW: “Planetary #1”

REVIEW: “Planetary #1”

If you looked up Planetary in my mind’s comic book thesaurus, its most fitting synonym would be “awesome-sauce.” That’s because for 27 issues, Warren Ellis and John Cassaday transformed one hundred years of super-hero history into the most suspenseful, action-packed tale of intrigue ever to hit the shelves. One of the many things that make this book so memorable is the way it incorporates allegories of the 20th century’s most iconic pop culture hits into…

Read More

REVIEW: “The Secret History of D.B. Cooper #3”

REVIEW: “The Secret History of D.B. Cooper #3”

This is not a book for the weak of mind or stomach. The latest installment of Brian Churilla’s psycho-pharmaceutical-driven espionage tale significantly raises the stakes for its titular hero.  Up to this point, Cooper has appeared as the epitome of the hard-boiled hero—irascible, invincible, and possessed of a secret which drives him on his quest. No longer. Cooper is less a hero and more an assassin. As we learn the scope of his past activities,…

Read More

REVIEW: “The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born #1”

REVIEW: “The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born #1”

In 2007, Marvel released The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born and quickly became the standard by which I judge all comic books. Based on Stephen King’s self-described magnum opus, The Dark Tower novels, there’s a lot of love to be had by fans of the science-fiction, western, and horror genres alike. The first issue opens with the enigmatic Man in Black being chased through the desert by our equally mysterious protagonist, Roland Deschain. Roland is…

Read More
1 119 120 121 122 123