ADVANCE REVIEW – The Death of Stalin: The Comedy of Tyranny

ADVANCE REVIEW – The Death of Stalin: The Comedy of Tyranny

Totalitarian regimes have, oddly enough, provided the best fodder for political comedy and satire. There’s something about the absurdity of living under brutality couched and protected by beauracracy that requires only the slightest nudge to tip into full on comedy. And through the years, we’ve seen satire used as a powerful weapon against the power of the state. From political cartoons, to films that took aim at fascism like Ernst Lubitch’s “To Be or Not…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: Space Riders 2: Galaxy of Brutality #2 – To Insanity and Beyond!

ADVANCE REVIEW: Space Riders 2: Galaxy of Brutality #2 – To Insanity and Beyond!

I loved everything about the first Space Riders series. I loved the balls-out bonkers story, written by Fabian Rangel Jr, I loved the mind-blowing comix-influenced psychedelic art by Alexis Ziritt, which was wonderfully enhanced by Ryan Ferrier‘s letters. Now, the series is back with another volume, and after a terrific first issue, I’m happy to report that Space Riders 2: Galaxy of Brutality #2 fits right in with the first volume; it’s gloriously vulgar and uninhibited space…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: Magnus #1: Magnus, Robot….Healer?

ADVANCE REVIEW: Magnus #1: Magnus, Robot….Healer?

Way back in 1963, Gold Key Comics debuted a new science-fiction/super-hero series called Magnus, Robot Fighter. Created by Russ Manning, Magnus has always had his fans, being a character that leaned more heavily towards pulpy sci-fi concepts than straight-ahead super hero action. Magnus #1, the latest iteration of the property by Kyle Higgins and Jorge Fornes, follows in that tradition with a debut issue that establishes an intriguing and rich classic science fiction concept and…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: Victor LaValle’s Destroyer #1 – A Truly Modern Prometheus

ADVANCE REVIEW: Victor LaValle’s Destroyer #1 – A Truly Modern Prometheus

When Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” was published in 1818, it bore the subtitle of “The Modern Prometheus.” In the nearly two centuries since its publication and since it became a cornerstone of both horror and science fiction, it’s often been forgotten that “Frankenstein” was seen as a amazingly modern work upon its release.  Written by a fearless and uncompromising woman, it commented on the fears and ambitions that lay underneath the period following the advancements of…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: Babyteeth #1 – Slouching Towards Bethlehem

ADVANCE REVIEW: Babyteeth #1 – Slouching Towards Bethlehem

In 1919, the poet WB Yeats wrote perhaps his most famous work, “The Second Coming.” Written in the aftermath of the First World War, Yeats was commenting on that conflict’s revelations about the primal brutality of humanity, and how Europe reeled from that war’s costs in dangerous and demoralized directions. But it also heavily drew upon Christian imagery of the Apocalypse and the Book of Revelations, and in that way, I thought about the poem a…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: James Bond: Service One-Shot – A Timely But Basic Thriller

ADVANCE REVIEW: James Bond: Service One-Shot – A Timely But Basic Thriller

I like to check in with Dynamite‘s James Bond line of titles, because so far they’ve been very good at attracting top notch talent to their collection of books following the adventures of Ian Fleming’s 007 and his allies. Some of the stories have impressed me, others less so, but overall the line of books have demonstrated an effective and coherent approach to telling Bond stories in the modern age that don’t copy the Eon…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: The Sovereigns #1 – Jump On To A Universe Reimagined

ADVANCE REVIEW: The Sovereigns #1 – Jump On To A Universe Reimagined

It’s easy to forget that there have almost always been super heroic alternatives to the universes of DC and Marvel, whether that was the Golden Age Captain Marvel, the Charlton Heroes or Archie Comics’ stabs at the genre. One of the most fondly remembered, if perpetually struggling, examples were Gold Key Comics’ roster of suers-hero and adventure titles. Now, those properties are licensed to Dynamite Entertainment, and the publisher is currently making a big push…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: Noble #1 Puts the Focus on Family

ADVANCE REVIEW: Noble #1 Puts the Focus on Family

On May 3rd, 2017, Noble #1 from Lion Forge drops onto store shelves and digital retailers, introducing new readers to the Powell family.  David Powell, astronaut, husband, and father, was forever changed when he sacrificed himself for humanity in something called “The Event.”  He has returned one year later with no memory of his former life, and with immense, strange new powers. The core of the comic, however, belongs to his wife, Astrid.  Astrid appears at the…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: James Bond: Hammerhead TPB – Sleek, Cool and Ruthless

ADVANCE REVIEW: James Bond: Hammerhead TPB – Sleek, Cool and Ruthless

A character as iconic as Ian Fleming’s Agent 007, James Bond, absolutely is worthy of being adapted to the comics book medium. There have been stabs over the years, some more successful as others, but Dynamite’s approach once they acquired the license to the property has produced some pretty intriguing successes, and none more so than James Bond: Hammerhead. This trade collects the six issue miniseries by writer Andy Diggle and artist Luca Casalanguida, and…

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ADVANCE REVIEW: Doctor Who – The Twelfth Doctor Year Three #2 – An Ordinary Diversion

ADVANCE REVIEW: Doctor Who – The Twelfth Doctor Year Three #2 – An Ordinary Diversion

The third year of Titan’s series depicting the adventures of the Twelfth Doctor kicked off with a first issue that was a fun mash-up of iconography from the classic TV series with the fast-paced character-based storytelling approach of the modern series. It boasted a promising start for the third volume of this series. And that’s why it’s undeniably a bummer to see Doctor Who – The Twelfth Doctor Year Three #2 be basically a fill-in,…

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