REVIEW: “The Secret History of D.B. Cooper #3”

REVIEW: “The Secret History of D.B. Cooper #3”

This is not a book for the weak of mind or stomach. The latest installment of Brian Churilla’s psycho-pharmaceutical-driven espionage tale significantly raises the stakes for its titular hero.  Up to this point, Cooper has appeared as the epitome of the hard-boiled hero—irascible, invincible, and possessed of a secret which drives him on his quest. No longer. Cooper is less a hero and more an assassin. As we learn the scope of his past activities,…

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EDITORIAL: Do Super-heroes Erode Trust In Government?

EDITORIAL: Do Super-heroes Erode Trust In Government?

Last week, I did a piece on whether or not vigilantism in comics is a good thing. The original source for the article was a column by Josh Horwitz, in which he discusses that vigilantism, overall, is typically indicative of a failing trust in governmental and societal institutions. This failure of trust results in a belief that problems are best solved by an individual acting alone rather than by a system that has become ineffectual….

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EDITORIAL: Is Vigilantism In Comics a Bad Thing?

EDITORIAL: Is Vigilantism In Comics a Bad Thing?

On Thursday, Josh Horwitz of the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence had a disturbing piece in the Huffington Post. The article, entitled “‘Second Amendment Vigilantes Systematically Dismantling Our Rights,” painted a frightening picture of a growing trend towards vigilantism in the United States. He chronicles the tale of an immigrant couple, moving into their new home, who were held at gunpoint by their would-be neighbors and wound up incarcerated by the local sheriff. In the…

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REVIEW: “Action Comics #9” The Return of Calvin Ellis

REVIEW: “Action Comics #9” The Return of Calvin Ellis

Since the last issue of Action Comics ended that particular story arc, Grant Morrison and company took a brief detour this month, giving us a one-off tale of Calvin Ellis, the Superman of Earth 23. This is a character who was debuted by Morrison himself back in Final Crisis, when he was recruited into the multiversal army of Superman to fight against the immortal space-vampire Mandrakk. While that particular résumé could only have sprung from Morrison’s unchained imagination,…

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EDITORIAL: Comics and Conspiracy: The Mining of the Lunatic Fringe

EDITORIAL: Comics and Conspiracy: The Mining of the Lunatic Fringe

Recently, in an interview with New Empress Magazine, controversial comic scribe Mark Millar was asked about the inspirations behind the Ultimates. As those who read our Digital Time Machine piece last week will remember, the Ultimates is without a doubt the most driving influence in comics behind the creation of the new Avengers movie. The book essentially cast actor Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury years before Marvel Studios even existed, much less began to…

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REVIEW: DMZ: On The Ground

REVIEW: DMZ: On The Ground

Welcome to the world of DMZ. What if Manhattan sat on the front line of an American Civil War? What if the citizens of a country that hasn’t seen warfare on its doorstep in almost one-hundred and fifty years found itself once again rent asunder and the greatest city of the 20th Century was caught in the middle? Imagine that, for a moment, all the images you see on the news of war-torn third-world nations…

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EDITORIAL: The Chaining of Clark Kent

EDITORIAL: The Chaining of Clark Kent

When superstar writer Grant Morrison was announced as the writer of DC Comics’ New 52 relaunch of Action Comics it was made clear that this was not going to be the Superman we were used to seeing. Taking his cue from the early work of Siegel and Schuster, Morrison’s Superman would return to his roots as a social crusader fighting for the little guy, the underrepresented masses who had been disenfranchised by the ever-increasing power of monied interests…

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REVIEW: The Unwritten: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity

REVIEW: The Unwritten: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity

There are few comic books out there which openly strive to be literature. The Unwritten is one of them, but it is far more than that. Its first volume, collecting the first five issues of the series in 2009, sets the stage for the driving theme of the work, that of a literary cabal who determines what stories will and will not be told so as to guide the path of the world. The Unwritten is…

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EDITORIAL: Why Super-Heroes Should Be More Political

EDITORIAL: Why Super-Heroes Should Be More Political

It’s time to really figure out if superheroes belong in the political arena. It can be difficult to find quality discussions on the role of politics in comic books. In the last year, there have been three articles of varying quality that have attempted to address this very divisive issue. Back in October, Sara “Babs” Lima of ComicVine.com posed the question to readers as to whether or not political content in comic books alienates readers….

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REVIEW: “The Secret History of D.B. Cooper #2”

REVIEW: “The Secret History of D.B. Cooper #2”

The second issue of Brian Churilla’s psychedelic epic simultaneously continues to dismay and disgust. Much like the first issue, we join the hero mid-action, this time providing us the back story behind his first meeting with the one-eared red teddy bear who will be his guide through much of the series. As before, the issue jumps back and forth between Cooper’s adventures in The Glut, the sickeningly surreal psychic world that seems to have impacts…

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